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  Vortigern Studies > Vortigern > The Sources

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Vortigern Studies has the internet's most comprehensive treatment of Britain's history from the end of the Roman era to Arthurian times. Edited by Robert M. Vermaat, this unique website focuses primarily on the person of Vortigern and the enigmatic earthwork called Wansdyke. It features narrative histories, original source documents and important texts, extensive bibliographies, reading lists, informative articles by guest writers, maps, polls and more.

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The Sources

This part of Vortigern Studies takes a good look at all the sources about Vortigern himself, but those about his time as well.

The top part discusses sources in general and presents part of the original texts both in Latin and English.

The second part of this section explores and discusses all sources that are connected with Vortigern (ranging from Gildas to the Welsh Triads), but also with the fifth century and the 'end of Roman Britain' (ranging from the Notitia Dignitatum to the Domesday Book). Several of these refer to off-site full texts, both in latin and English where available.

Also, I have printed the relevant parts of the sources about Vortigern, from Gildas to the Bruts. The texts of the sources dealing with British history of the 4-6th centuries are in this section, but the texts of the sources dealing specifically with Vortigern can be found in the History or in the Guests' articles sections.

However, to avoid confusion all texts are shown in both sections.

The image of the scribe is a detail of a medieval ivory, now in the Vienna Museum. I am not sure of the name or date of the artifact.

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